As online usage becomes more prevalent, computer game use increases and younger generations tune out the TV and turn on the computer, the need for IT professionals and computer specialists may rise.

Computers are quickly taking over the entertainment industry. The market for CDs has continued to decline – sales are down 19.6 percent the New York Post reported recently – while online streaming becomes more popular. Computer gaming has grown exponentially. Even the TV screen is taking a back seat while a growing number of people look to their computer monitors for entertainment.

Moreover, as online usage becomes more prevalent, computer game use increases and younger generations tune out the TV and turn on the computer, the need for IT professionals and computer specialists may rise.

COMPUTER GAMING BOOMS!
While the rise of computer gaming may come as no surprise, the rate of the trend is particularly interesting. The Entertainment Software Association reported that over half – 58 percent to be exact – of Americans play video games currently. On average, U.S. households have at least one dedicated game console, PC or smartphone. Even parents see the benefits of game systems today as 51 percent say they have a positive impact on children. Waves of individuals are taking advantage of computer games, and the trend continues to gain steam.

Michael D. Gallagher, CEO of the Entertainment Software Association, said in a report published by the company, “No other sector has experienced the same explosive growth as the computer and video game industry.”

END OF THE TV SET
Meanwhile, TV viewers are also paying more attention to their computers. According to eMarketer, the rate of adults spending time consuming digital media – primarily online and mobile content – has been steadily increasing at a rate larger than TV viewers. In fact, the organization predicted a decline in TV watching in 2013, while digital media use was predicted to climb by over 15 percent.

Cable is being pressed further by streaming show platforms such as Netflix, HBO, Hulu and others. In fact, Forbes reported that more than 5 million households in the U.S. had no TV service whatsoever – up from just over 2 million in 2007.

Now, computers are the center of the workplace and the leisure time at home. As computer use becomes the new norm in entertainment, more households will rely on qualified computer specialists to solve their more specialized tech issues. If you’d like to journey into the growing world of computers, take the MyComputerCareer Evaluation to see whether a career in computers may be right for you.